2015-12-16 17:48:38 UTC

Dec. 16, 2015

Janelle Arthur, PhD, and her team have developed a novel approach employing molecularly-tagged E. coli strains isolated from IBD patients. Janelle Arthur, PhD, and her team have developed

Janelle C. Arthur, PhD, received the 2015 Caroline Craig Augustyn & Damian Augustyn grant in digestive cancer. She is using the AGA research award funding to support her investigation into the microbiota of IBD patients to help better understand IBD, IBD-associated dysplasia and colorectal cancer in IBD patients. Dr. Arthur is an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 “It is now generally believed that IBD patients harbor an altered microbiota from healthy individuals. One consistently observed alteration is an increased abundance of Escherichia coli bacteria. E. coli are a highly diverse group, and little is known about which E. coli characteristics contribute to health vs. disease,” Dr. Arthur noted. 

Dr. Arthur and her team have developed a novel approach employing molecularly tagged E. coli strains isolated from IBD patients. Using fecal microbiota transplantation in sterile mice, they plan to rapidly quantify individual E. coli strains using modern high-throughput sequencing.

 “Support from the Augustyn family is integral to establishing this novel approach and obtaining future independent funding from agencies such as the NIH and AGA,” she added.

Learn more about this award on the AGA Research Foundation section of the AGA website and nominate someone today for the 2016 Caroline Craig Augustyn & Damian Augustyn Award

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